‎‘How to Think Like Churchill’ in Persian released

 
Publish Date : Wednesday 10 October 2018 - 19:17
 
 
IBNA- From the series of ‘How to Think…’ books by Daniel Smith, a new volume about ‎Winston Churchill has been translated into Persian and released.‎
 
According to IBNA correspondent, the translator of the series, Siamak Dashti has come across the idea to name the series in Persian ‘From the View of Geniuses’, which describe the lives of those who have influenced the history of mankind. The series by Daniel Smith offers a delightful story-like account of these people.

On the back cover of ‘How to Think Like Churchill’ describes that the British Prime Minister had a multifaceted character in his youth, a rebel who when became a politician was uncompromising. Everybody knew him as a reformist, an accomplished journalist, a soldier, a pacifist, an artist and historian who won the Nobel Prize of Literature [although his status as the conqueror of the World War II played the role in receiving the award].

The book reads: “Prime Minister of the UK from 1940 to 1945 and again from 1951 to 1955, Winston Churchill will always be remembered for his leadership of his country during the Second World War. His commitment to 'never surrender', as well as his stirring speeches and radio broadcasts, helped inspire British resistance to the Nazi threat when Britain stood alone against an occupied Europe.

However, his political career did not always show a continual upwards trajectory. After the First World War, he left government and spent the 1930s in the political 'wilderness'. But, as one of the few voices warning about Nazi Germany, he returned to government to play his part in defeating Nazism and becoming one of the defining figures of the twentieth century.”

In ‘How to Think Like Churchill’, the author looks at defining moments in Churchill's life and reveals the key principles, philosophies, and decisions that made him the man we remember him as: leader, visionary and national hero.
 
 
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Story Code: 266281